kino-obscura:

TYPOGRAPHY: WONG KAR-WAI (1988-2013)

kino-obscura:

TYPOGRAPHY: WONG KAR-WAI (1988-2013)

kino-obscura:

TYPOGRAPHY: WONG KAR-WAI (1988-2013)

kino-obscura:

TYPOGRAPHY: WONG KAR-WAI (1988-2013)

kino-obscura:

TYPOGRAPHY: WONG KAR-WAI (1988-2013)

kino-obscura:

TYPOGRAPHY: WONG KAR-WAI (1988-2013)

kino-obscura:

TYPOGRAPHY: WONG KAR-WAI (1988-2013)

kino-obscura:

TYPOGRAPHY: WONG KAR-WAI (1988-2013)

kino-obscura:

TYPOGRAPHY: WONG KAR-WAI (1988-2013)

kino-obscura:

TYPOGRAPHY: WONG KAR-WAI (1988-2013)

kino-obscura:

TYPOGRAPHY: WONG KAR-WAI (1988-2013)

 

Happy birthday Wong Kar-Wai, it’s my fourth time watching Chungking Express and i still love this scene so much.

(Source: misplacedland, via gorgeousnessss)

dig-image:

Nikolas Gambaroff
http://www.contemporaryartdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/2014-04-28MeyerKainer-GAMBAROFF-4423FIN-A.jpg

dig-image:

Nikolas Gambaroff

livelymorgue:

April 7, 1983: For the 50th anniversary of the “King Kong” film, a 3,000-pound model was being hoisted onto the Empire State Building once again, but “with a blowout in an armpit” and other problems, the nylon replica ape was a laughingstock, or a disappointment, but not a terror, for millions of metropolitan area residents. Photo: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

April 7, 1983: For the 50th anniversary of the “King Kong” film, a 3,000-pound model was being hoisted onto the Empire State Building once again, but “with a blowout in an armpit” and other problems, the nylon replica ape was a laughingstock, or a disappointment, but not a terror, for millions of metropolitan area residents. Photo: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

April 7, 1983: For the 50th anniversary of the “King Kong” film, a 3,000-pound model was being hoisted onto the Empire State Building once again, but “with a blowout in an armpit” and other problems, the nylon replica ape was a laughingstock, or a disappointment, but not a terror, for millions of metropolitan area residents. Photo: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

Kazumasa Nagai

Kazumasa Nagai

text-mode:

Nicely synchronized abstract ASCII-video by Institut für Musik und Medien, 2011.

50watts:

Poesia de Angola book cover via Writers No One Reads. Cover by José Rodrigues.

50watts:

Poesia de Angola book cover via Writers No One Reads. Cover by José Rodrigues.

50watts:

By Argentinian graphic designer Eduardo A. Cánovas, Estudio Cánovas (late  70s), via Dispokino.

50watts:

By Argentinian graphic designer Eduardo A. Cánovas, Estudio Cánovas (late  70s), via Dispokino.

(Source: threeblackdots, via shihlun)

design-is-fine:

Sir Peter Blake, Alphabet, letter A, n.d. Source

In the 1950s, Blake began using ‘found letters’ or commercial lettering in his work, as well as printed materials such as comic strips and advertising texts, allying himself with sign painters, decorators, and commercial artists. Declaring himself a ‘pop’ artist, he joined the ranks of Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg and Rosenquist, in their provocation of the fine art establishment. He is famous for the cover of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely hearts club band.

design-is-fine:

Sir Peter Blake, Alphabet, letter A, n.d. Source

In the 1950s, Blake began using ‘found letters’ or commercial lettering in his work, as well as printed materials such as comic strips and advertising texts, allying himself with sign painters, decorators, and commercial artists. Declaring himself a ‘pop’ artist, he joined the ranks of Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg and Rosenquist, in their provocation of the fine art establishment. He is famous for the cover of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely hearts club band.